UPCOMING

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Local Music

Willie K

Willie K

Tue -
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When the Honolulu Pulse said, “Willie K can play or sing almost anything an American audience might ask for,” that wasn’t hype, it was the literal truth. The Hawaiian phenomenon Willie K is undoubtedly the only artist i
When the Honolulu Pulse said, “Willie K can play or sing almost anything an American audience might ask for,” that wasn’t hype, it was the literal truth. The Hawaiian phenomenon Willie K is undoubtedly the only artist in the world who can go into an Irish pub in the middle of Maui and play anything from indigenous acoustic Hawaiian music to jazz, reggae, rock, country and even opera—and not only get away with it but leave everyone within earshot slack-jawed in astonishment. No less than Prince is a huge fan, calling Willie K a “funky mother#%@&er,” while another avowed fan is a fellow Hawaiian who goes by the name Barack Obama.
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Keauhou

Keauhou

Fri -
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Keauhou finds passion and joy in the performance preservation, and perpetuation of traditional Hawaiian music.

The name, “Keauhou,” was suggested by Hailama Farden, while the trio played music at the Kamehameha School’
Keauhou finds passion and joy in the performance preservation, and perpetuation of traditional Hawaiian music.

The name, “Keauhou,” was suggested by Hailama Farden, while the trio played music at the Kamehameha School’s Midkiff Library. This library is home to the waʻa (Hawaiian canoe) named “Makani Hou o Keauhou,” under which the group performed. Translated as “the new wind of Keauhou,” this waʻa became the inspiration for the group name, “Keauhou.” While the Hawaiian language offers a multiplicity of meanings and translations, the groups name can be translated as “the new/renewed generation.”

This name defines the young trio, Kahanuola Solatorio, and brothers, Nicholas and Zachary Lum, as they strive to bring forth inspiration from Hawaiian music of the eras preceding them, and contribute to a renewed respect and interest for the incomparable beauty of traditional Hawaiian music.

These three graduates of the Kamehameha Schools Kapālama found their musical roots through their involvement in the many musical and cultural opportunities offered at Kamehameha Schools. They sang in the concert glee club, played in the band and both Lum brothers held the esteemed positions as their class’ student director in the world-renowned song contest.

Kahanuola and Nicholas recently graduated with their Master's Degree in the fields of Education and Hawaiian language, respectively, at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. Zachary is currently the Choral Director of the prestigious Kamehameha School's Concert Glee Club and also a Master's candidate in the field of Ethnomusicology at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. All three are active and passionate educators and cultural practitioners in their fields.

In 2008, Keauhou was awarded first place in the unamplified traditional Hawaiian music contest, “Ka Himeni Ana,” held annually at the Hawaiʻi Theater. In 2017, Keauhou took top honors at the Nā Hōkū Hanohano awards attaining nine awards in nine categories for their debut album, "Keauhou." The group is currently in the process of recording their second project hopefully to be released by the end of 2017.

Kahanuola, Nicholas and Zachary are truly thankful for the many opportunities and honors with which they have been blessed as well as the many more to come. With the relationships between them and the guidance of akua, kūpuna, ʻohana, and kumu alike, the members of Keauhou hope to offer a seemingly-new sound to the Hawaiian music scene, inspired by those who have come before. E koʻolau ke kō a Keauhou.
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Nā Hoa

Nā Hoa

Sun -
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Nā Hoa secured their first GRAMMY® Award nomination in the Best Regional Roots Album category as the Recording Academy announced on December 7th, 2018, the final ballot nominees for the 61st GRAMMY® Awards. The Best Region
Nā Hoa secured their first GRAMMY® Award nomination in the Best Regional Roots Album category as the Recording Academy announced on December 7th, 2018, the final ballot nominees for the 61st GRAMMY® Awards. The Best Regional Roots Album category is dedicated to recording artists for releasing albums in regionally based traditional American music, including Hawaiian, Native American, Polka, Zydeco, and Cajun genres.

High-pitched falsetto voices whimsically singing traditional Hawaiian tunes bring forth images of Hawai‘i’s unparalleled history and scenic terrain. Falsetto singing is an integral component and trademark of traditional Hawaiian music, which is the genre that Keoni Souza (bass), 34, Ikaika Blackburn (‘ukulele), 36, and Hale Seabury-Akaka (guitar), 35, have diligently worked hard to perpetuate over the years. Together they form the group Nā Hoa, simply meaning “friends” in Hawaiian.

Young men playing songs of Hawai‘i’s past is minimal, yet the niche is rapidly growing as more young Hawaiians find solace in their roots. As Nā Hoa acknowledges the importance of their heritage and pays tribute to the decorated musicians that went before them, they are filled with a tranquil sincerity and obligation which is unmatched.

Each of the three group members plays music all over the world, individually or as a group, for select hālau (hula groups) who showcase their hula in competitions or concerts at different locales. The most frequently visited destination for the trio is Japan, where the market for traditional Hawaiian music is potent with demand. Souza’s most notable performance was at the prestigious Carnegie Hall in New York City. Other destinations that have been entranced with Nā Hoa’s music include: New Zealand, Australia, Canada, and California.
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